30-day Blogging Challenge: Day 30 (A motto or philosophy)

Before the month of October ends, I finished reading my first Paulo Coelho – The Alchemist. I remember I was in high school when his novels started gaining attention, but I didn’t find myself included in the hype. I tried leafing through the first pages of one of his books, which I have forgotten the title, and found it uninteresting. So I put it down and changed to another. However, last week I was looking for a new book to read. This sounds funny at first since I have a long list in my TBR pile. Too many books to Read More …

30-day Blogging Challenge: Day 17 (An art piece)

Last night, I have finished pouring over Rick Riordan’s The Mark of Athena. As the third installment of The Heroes of Olympus (Series 2 of The Olympians series with Percy Jackson), the novel focused on the quest the seven demigods from two camps (Roman and Greek) must complete and achieve. In the story, the Mark is a coin of an owl, an animal sacred to the goddess of wisdom, art, war, justice, and skill. The Greek daughter of Athena must go on a solo quest to accomplish something that generations of the goddess’ children failed to do. Guided by the Read More …

30-day blogging challenge: Day 5 (Favorite Quote)

I am not sure if my answer will qualify as a quote. For me, it is more of a guiding principle; something for me to believe most of the time. Man is inherently good. –        John Locke Now, before you raise your eyebrows at this quote by John Locke, I want to explain my side. I want to believe that all of us are good by nature. In my 22 years of existence, I have experienced a lot of negative things – betrayals, lies, back stabbings, break-ups, rejections, etc. and some may assume that I have been jaded in life Read More …

Wisest is she who knows that she doesn’t know

Who are you? Where does the world come from? These are two questions that Sophie got when she received her mail. A story about a Norwegian girl coming to philosophical consciousness with the aid of her philosopher friend, Jostein Gaarder’s Sophie’s World helped the readers travel to the history of Western philosophy, from Socrates time to Sartre. Gaarder’s style to put a sort of textbook material into an interesting mystery novel motivated young readers to read it, too. I’ve read this book as a requirement in one of my classes in History of Political Thoughts. I always want to read Read More …